Economic Policy Europe Foreign Trade and International Economic Relations

Investment, not the surplus, is Germany’s big problem

This article was first published on FT.com on 18th November 2013.

Germany is under attack from the US government, the International Monetary Fund and the European Commission for its huge current account surplus. The criticism is right, but for the wrong reasons. The surplus is excessive, but the accusation that it hurts Europe is nonsense. Worse, it distracts German policy makers from tackling the true cause of the national surplus and the country’s economic Achilles heel: its huge private investment … [continue reading]

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Currency and Financial Markets Europe Macroeconomics

Delusional Gemany

This article was first published on Project Syndicate on 14 November 2013.

In recent days, Germany’s representative on the European Central Bank’s governing council has expressed strong disagreement with the ECB’s decision on November 7 to cut its benchmark interest rate. Now the European Commission has opened an investigation into whether or not Germany’s huge current-account surplus is causing economic damage in the European Union and beyond. This investigation and criticism of Germany’s export-based growth model has incited outrage in … [continue reading]

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Currency and Financial Markets Economic Policy Europe

Towards a Euro Union

Why we need more European integration to prevent further crises. Eleven German economists, lawyers and political scientists – the Glienicker Group – make suggestions.

Crisis, what crisis? If public sentiment in Germany is anything to go by, there is little reason to worry about Europe. The period when it was feared that the euro might collapse seems a long time ago. Financial markets have calmed down. The design flaws of the monetary union seem to have been papered over, and … [continue reading]

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Currency and Financial Markets Europe Public Finances and Financial Economics

The Costs for Germany if the Eurozone Collapses

This article first appeared in the Autumn 2013 issue of Europe’s World (www.europesworld.org).

It’s not a message that public opinion in Germany wants to hear, but a collapse of the EU’s troubled single currency would have devastating economic, financial and political consequences for the eurozone’s largest and most successful member.

Germans have long been among the most europhile of countries, but their mood is turning against Europe and its common currency, the euro. There’s now an openly anti-euro … [continue reading]

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